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Age Specific Screening for Women ages 20 - 30

Annual Pelvic Exam and Pap smear
Contraceptive Management
Annual physical including Blood Pressure and Periodic Cholesterol testing
Monthly Self-Examination of Breast
Mammogram, if necessary
Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Screening
Preconception Counseling
Smoking Cessation
Exercise
Immunizations

Age Specific Screening for Women ages 30 - 50

Annual Pelvic Exam and Pap smear to detect Cervical, Ovarian and Uterine Cancer
Annual physical including Blood Pressure and Periodic Cholesterol testing
Preconception Counseling
Monthly Self-Examination of Breasts
Mammogram, every one to two years
Colon Cancer Screening
Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Screening
Contraceptive Options
Smoking Cessation
Bone Density 40 years and up
Exercise
Immunizations

Age Specific Screening for Women ages 50 - Up

Annual Pelvic Exam and Pap smear to detect Cervical, Ovarian and Uterine Cancer
Annual physical, including Blood Pressure and Cholesterol testing
Annual Mammogram
Monthly Self-Examination of Breast
Bone Mineral Density (BMD) testing
Calcium and Vitamin D Therapy
Colon Cancer Screening and Colonoscopy
Smoking Cessation
Exercise
Immunizations

Breast Self Exam

Genital Herpes

Human Papillomavirus(HPV)

HPV Vaccine

Abnormal Pap Smear

Uterine Fibroids

Pelvic Pain

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Vulvodynia

Ovarian Cysts

Procedure - Colposcopy

During a colposcopy, the doctor uses a special microscope called a colposcope to closely examine the cervix, vagina, or vulva. Generally performed in the doctorís office, this examination requires no anesthesia, as the colposcope remains positioned outside of the patientís body at all times. A colposcopic examination takes approximately 20 minutes.

A colposcopy begins much like an ordinary pelvic exam, with the patientís feet in stirrups and the vagina held open with a speculum. The doctor then washes the area to be examined with a concentrated vinegar preparation that makes some types cells more visible. The light and high magnification that the colposcope provides makes it possible for the doctor to visualize abnormal tissue and collect samples for examination by a pathologist.

The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommends that persistent abnormalities of the cervix should be evaluated by a colposcopic examination. If you have an abnormal Pap smear, are experiencing heavy bleeding, have a score on the vulva, or have reported pain during intercourse, your doctor may recommend colposcopy.

If your mother took the drug DES (diethylstilbestrol) when she was pregnant with you, you are at risk for abnormal cervical cell growth, and your doctor may recommend annual colposcopic examinations.

Recommended references:
The New Harvard Guild to Womenís Health, by Karen j. Carlson, M.D., Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., and Terra Ziporyn, Ph.D. Harvard University Press (2004).

Procedure - Leep

If the results of your Pap smear indicate abnormalities (dysphasia) of your cervix, the doctor many want to repeat the test at a later date. Some dysphasia is mild and will go away without treatment, but persistent or widespread dysphasia requires treatment, as it may lead to the development of cervical cancer. A loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) is one way of both diagnosing and treating cervical abnormalities at the same time.

During LEEP, a lighted magnifying microscope called a colposcope is used to visualize the cervix. The doctor uses and instrument with a thin, electrified wire loop. As this loop removes the abnormal tissue, it also cauterized the blood vessel to control bleeding. The tissue can then be examined by a pathologist, who will look for cancerous cells. The removal of precancerous or early-stage cancer cells during LEEP may be the only treatment required.

LEEP can be performed in the doctorís office or in a surgical clinic. Local anesthesia will be administered to the cervix and the procedure takes only a few minutes. Recovery time is short, but expect your doctor to advise you to avoid sexual intercourses or using tampons for two or three weeks while your cervix heals. Patients may experience minor bleeding and a vaginal discharge for a few weeks after LEEP. As with any surgical procedure, there is some risk of infection.

Recommended reference:
The New Harvard Guild to Womenís Health, by Karen j. Carlson, M.D., Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., and Terra Ziporyn, Ph.D. Harvard University Press (2004).

Procedure - Endometrial Biopsy

Is an office procedure that includes removal of tissue from the endometrial, (the inner lining of the uterus.) This procedure is often used to investigate bleeding between periods, post menopausal bleeding, and infertility condition. A small plastic catheter is inserted through the cervix into the uterus and mild suction is applied. Tissue is obtained, which is then sent to the pathologist for examination.

Urinary Incontinence

Birth Control Pill Instructions

Detecting and Treating Breast Problems

Evaluating Infertility

The Menopause Years

Herbal Products for Menopause

Osteoporosis

Exercise and Fitness



TEENS

Growing Up

Menstruation

Birth control

Your First Gyn Visit



CONTRACEPTION

Birth Control

The Intrauterine Device

Hormonal Contraception, injections, rings, patches

Sterilization by Laproscopy



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The OB-GYN Place, located in Rockwall, Texas, serves the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex including:
Rowlett, Garland, Mesquite, Fate, Heath, Royse City, Greenville, Terrell, Wills Point, Canton, Kaufman, Forney
OBGYN, gynecology, physicians
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